Kinkster

Book review:
Gay & Bisexual Men Living with Prostate Cancer,
edited by Jane M. Ussher, Janette Perz, and B.R. Simon Rosser

Healthy living is a term used frequently, but what does that honestly mean? Ask a trainer, and they would say you need to exercise. Ask a nutritionist, and they might say it’s essential to monitor the food you eat. And if you asked a doctor, well, the list of do’s and don’ts for maintaining a healthy lifestyle takes on an entirely new meaning! No matter how hard we try, we all fall short when it comes to our health, and it’s even worse and even more critical to think about healthy living when diagnosed with an illness, like prostate cancer.

Educating ourselves is how we can begin to understand healthy living even when faced with health challenges.

One of the leading causes of cancer death in men of all races is prostate cancer. It is prevalent cancer in men in the United States. In the U.S., around 209,292 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, and approximately 27,970 will die from it.

Being an African-American gay male of a particular age, having a prostate exam is a top priority which is why when I was asked to read, “Gay & BiSexual Men Living With Prostate Cancer from Diagnosis to Recovery,” I could not resist.

Unfamiliar with the experiences and concerns of gay or bisexual men (GBM) living with prostate cancer, from adjusting sexual practices after treatment to the effects of radiation therapy, I gained insight into how prostate cancer affects gay and bi men.

Honestly, I struggled with putting a review together because I was worried I wouldn’t pull out the wealth of information provided throughout the book, but chatting with Andy Reynolds gave me feedback and insight as to why it was essential for us to feature the book. “It’s written for grad students and those who treat cancer patients, not intended for the general public or casual reading.”

The book states, “Despite the recent growth in cancer care research specific to sexual-minority populations, comprehensive care models of prostate cancer inclusive of gay and bisexual men (GBM) and transgender woman (TGW) are lacking.” That said, it is essential for all gay men to know that this book is in their corner. The foreword and personal experiences of patients are the most distinct sections.

“Community-level resources have been identified as particularly important to GBM with prostate cancer. A sense of belonging and the ability to depend on a supportive community may be critical to the health and adjustment of sexual minorities.” It’s critical. Therefore, we share our experiences and support one another through the impacts of prostate cancer.

“Gay & Bisexual Men Living With Prostate Cancer” is a must-read for any healthcare professional or student who seeks insight into the diagnostic and recovery aspects of GBM living through the experience of prostate cancer.

This book is a must-read for any health care professional or student who seeks insight into the diagnostic and recovery aspects of GBM living through the experience of prostate cancer.

Reviewed by Corey Wesley